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Studies: 1490 | Downloads: 49631
Description:

LFS data are used to produce the well-known unemployment rate as well as other standard labour market indicators such as the employment rate and the participation rate. The LFS also provides employment estimates by industry, occupation, public and private sector, hours worked and much more, all cross-classifiable by a variety of demographic characteristics. Estimates are produced for Canada, the provinces, the territories and a large number of sub-provincial regions. For employees, data on wage rates, union status, job permanency and establishment size are also produced.

These data are used by different levels of government for evaluation and planning of employment programs in Canada. Regional unemployment rates are used by Employment and Social Development Canada to determine eligibility, level and duration of insurance benefits for persons living within a particular employment insurance region. The data are also used by labour market analysts, economists, consultants, planners, forecasters and academics in both the private and public sector.

hdl:11272/10575
4 downloads + analyses
Last Released: Feb 13, 2018
Description:

CanMap Content Suite contains over 100 unique and rich content layers. Each layer has a unique file and layer name with associated definitions, descriptions, attribution and metadata. All layers, with a few exceptions, are vector data consisting of polygon, polyline, or point geometry representation.

hdl:11272/MJRF2
520 downloads
Last Released: Jan 19, 2018
Description:

The Postal Codes by Federal Ridings File (PCFRF) is a digital file which provides a link between the six- character postal code and Canada’s federal electoral districts (which are also known as federal ridings). Elections Canada defines a federal electoral district (FED) as any place or territorial area entitled to return

a Member of Parliament (MP) to serve in the House of Commons. Federal electoral district legal limits and descriptions are the responsibility of the Chief Electoral Officer, and are usually revised every ten years after the results of the decennial census. There are 338 FEDs in the 2013 Representation Order, the most recent revision of the federal electoral districts limits.

hdl:11272/10537
3 downloads
Last Released: Jan 16, 2018
Description:

The Postal Code Conversion File (PCCF) is a digital file which provides a correspondence between the Canada Post Corporation (CPC) six-character postal code and Statistics Canada’s standard geographic areas for which census data and other statistics are produced. Through the link between postal codes and standard geographic areas, the PCCF permits the integration of data from various sources.

The geographic coordinates, which represent the standard geostatistical areas linked to each postal code on the PCCF, are commonly used to map the distribution of data for spatial analysis (e.g., clients, activities). The location information is a powerful tool for marketing, planning, or research purposes. In April 1983, the Statistical Registers and Geography Division released the first version of the PCCF, which linked postal codes to 1981 Census geographic areas and included geographic coordinates. Since then, the file has been updated on a regular basis to reflect changes.

For this release of the PCCF, the vast majority of the postal codes are directly geocoded to 2016 Census geography while others are linked via various conversion processes. A quality indicator for the confidence of this linkage is available in the PCCF.

hdl:11272/10536
20 downloads
Last Released: Jan 16, 2018
Description:

The Labour Force Survey provides estimates of employment and unemployment which are among the most timely and important measures of performance of the Canadian economy. With the release of the survey results only 10 days after the completion of data collection, the LFS estimates are the first of the major monthly economic data series to be released.

The Canadian Labour Force Survey was developed following the Second World War to satisfy a need for reliable and timely data on the labour market. Information was urgently required on the massive labour market changes involved in the transition from a war to a peace-time economy. The main objective of the LFS is to divide the working-age population into three mutually exclusive classifications - employed, unemployed, and not in the labour force - and to provide descriptive and explanatory data on each of these.

LFS data are used to produce the well-known unemployment rate as well as other standard labour market indicators such as the employment rate and the participation rate. The LFS also provides employment estimates by industry, occupation, public and private sector, hours worked and much more, all cross-classifiable by a variety of demographic characteristics. Estimates are produced for Canada, the provinces, the territories and a large number of sub-provincial regions. For employees, wage rates, union status, job permanency and workplace size are also produced. For a full listing and description of LFS variables, see the Guide to the Labour Force Survey (71-543-G), available through the "Publications" link above.

These data are used by different levels of government for evaluation and planning of employment programs in Canada. Regional unemployment rates are used by Employment and Social Development Canada to determine eligibility, level and duration of insurance benefits for persons living within a particular employment insurance region. The data are also used by labour market analysts, economists, consultants, planners, forecasters and academics in both the private and public sector.

Important note -- 4 August 2017

Labour Force Survey (LFS) data from January 2017 – July 2017 contained errors with numerical variables. Variables such as HRLYARN and UHRSMAIN were missing decimal place holders. As such, their values were off by a factor of 100. The issue has been addressed and the data for the year re-released

hdl:11272/10439
171 downloads + analyses
Last Released: Jan 16, 2018
Description:

The Social Policy Simulation Database and Model (SPSD/M) is a tool designed to assist those interested in analyzing the financial interactions of governments and individuals in Canada. It can help one to assess the cost implications or income redistributive effects of changes in the personal taxation and cash transfer system. As the name implies, SPSD/M consists of two integrated parts: a database (SPSD), and a model (SPSM). The SPSD is a non-confidential, statistically representative database of individuals in their family context, with enough information on each individual to compute taxes paid to and cash transfers received from government. The SPSM is a static accounting model which processes each individual and family on the SPSD, calculates taxes and transfers using legislated or proposed programs and algorithms, and reports on the results. A sophisticated software environment gives the user a high degree of control over the inputs and outputs to the model and can allow the user to modify existing programs or test proposals for entirely new programs. The model comes with full documentation including an on-line help facility.

Users and Applications

The SPSD/M has been used in hundreds of sites across Canada. These sites have diverse research interests in the area of income tax-transfer and commodity tax systems in Canada as well as varied experience in micro-simulation. Our growing client base includes federal departments, provincial governments, universities, interest groups, corporate divisions, and private consultants. The diverse applications of the SPSD/M can be seen in the following examples of studies and published research reports:

  • Costing out proposals for amendments to the Income Tax Act affecting the tax treatment of seniors and the disabled
  • Estimating the fiscal viability of major personal tax reform options, including three flat tax scenarios
  • The comparison low income (poverty) measures and their effect on the estimates of the number of poor
  • An Analysis of the Distributional Impact of the Goods and Services Tax
  • Married and Unmarried Couples: The Tax Question
  • Taxes and Transfers in Rural Canada
  • Equivalencies in Canadian Public Policy
  • When the Baby Boom Grows Old: Impact on Canada's Public Sector

Some potential uses of the model are illustrated by the following list of questions which may be answered using the SPSM:

  • How large an increase in the federal Child Tax Benefit could be financed by allocating an additional $500 million to the program?
  • Which province would have the most advantageous tax structure for an individual with $45,000 earned income, 2 children and $15,000 of investment income?
  • What is the after-tax value of the major federal child support programs on a per child basis, and how are these benefits distributed across family types and income groups?
  • How many individuals otherwise paying no tax would have to pay tax under various minimum tax systems, and what would additional government revenues be?
  • How much money would be needed to raise all low income families and persons to Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs in 2014?
  • How much would average household "consumable" income rise if a province eliminated its gasoline taxes?
  • How much would federal government revenue rise by if there was an increase in the GST rate?

hdl:11272/10535
4 downloads
Last Released: Jan 15, 2018
Description:

This survey monitors changes in time use to better understand how Canadians spend and manage their time and what contributes to their well-being and stress.

The data collected provides information to all level of governments when making funding decisions, developing priorities and identifying areas of concern for legislation, new policies and programs. Researchers and other users use this information to inform the general Canadian population about the changing nature of time use in Canada such as:

  • Are we working too many hours and spending too much time commuting?
  • Do we have flexible work schedules?
  • Do we have enough time to play sports, participate in leisure activities or volunteer?
  • Are we spending enough quality time with our children, our families and our friends?
  • How has the internet and social media affected the way we spend our time?
  • Are we satisfied with our lives? Statistical activity

This record is part of the General Social Survey (GSS) program. The GSS originated in 1985. Each survey contains a core topic, focus or exploratory questions and a standard set of socio-demographic questions used for classification. More recent cycles have also included some qualitative questions, which explore intentions and perceptions.

hdl:11272/10509
223 downloads + analyses
Last Released: Jan 5, 2018
Description:

The main purpose of this survey is to study the coverage of the employment insurance program. It provides a meaningful picture of who does or does not have access to EI benefits among the jobless and those in a situation of underemployment. The Employment Insurance Coverage Survey also covers access to maternity and parental benefits.

The survey was designed to produce a series of precise measures to identify groups with low probability of receiving benefits, for instance, the long-term jobless, labour market entrants and students, people becoming unemployed after uninsured employment, people who have left jobs voluntarily and individuals who are eligible, given their employment history, but do not claim or otherwise receive benefits. The survey provides a detailed description of the characteristics of the last job held as well as reasons for not receiving benefits or for not claiming.

Through the survey data, analysts will also be able to observe the characteristics and situation of people not covered by EI and of those who exhausted EI benefits, the job search intensity of the unemployed, expectation of recall to a job, and alternate sources of income and funds.

Survey data pertaining to maternity and parental benefits answer questions on the proportion of mothers of an infant who received maternity and parental benefits, the reason why some mothers do not receive benefits and about sharing parental benefits with their spouse. The survey also allows looking at the timing and circumstances related to the return to work, the income adequacy of households with young children and more.Â

hdl:11272/10530
6 downloads + analyses
Last Released: Dec 15, 2017
Description:

Orthorectified aerial imagery of the UBC Vancouver campus, 2017. Ortho Pixel size - 10 cm

hdl:11272/SX0HP
33 downloads
Last Released: Nov 24, 2017
Description:

The 2016 Census Geographic Attribute File contains information at the dissemination block level, based on 2016 Census standard geographic areas. The data available include population counts, dwelling counts and land area. In addition, the 2016 Census Geographic Attribute File contains higher level standard geographic codes, names and, where applicable, types and classes. Data for higher level standard geographic areas can be derived by aggregating dissemination block-level data. The dissemination area representative point coordinates are also included in the 2016 Census Geographic Attribute File.

This version of the Geographic Attribute File is a dissemination block (DB)-level dataset which also includes data for the following 2016 Census standard geographic areas:

  • province and territory (PR)
  • economic region (ER)
  • census division (CD)
  • census consolidated subdivision (CCS)
  • census subdivision (CSD)
  • designated place (DPL)
  • federal electoral district (FED) (2013 Representation Order)
  • census metropolitan area (CMA), census agglomeration (CA) and census metropolitan in uenced zone (MIZ)
  • census tract (CT)
  • population centre (POPCTR) and rural area (RA)
  • aggregate dissemination area (ADA)
  • dissemination area (DA)

hdl:11272/10524
15 downloads
Last Released: Nov 22, 2017
 
 
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